Bring in the experts: on Jayalalithaa’s death

Share This Article with Your Friends
  • 25
    Shares
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

 

 

 

Bring in the experts: on Jayalalithaa’s death

MORE-IN
Jayalalithaa
Jayalalithaa’s death does not deserve to be clouded by murky conspiracy theories
The philosopher Karl Popper argued(तर्क दिया) that conspiracy(साजिश/मंत्रणा) theories are often(अक्सर ) premised(आधारित) on the notion that events are manipulated(चालाकी से/तोड़ना-मरोड़ना) by sinister(बुरा/अशुभ ) groups, shaped(आकार ) by a distrust(अविश्वास) of the notion of randomness(अनियमितता) and a yearning to explain phenomena(घटनाएं/प्रतिभास) in terms of an underlying or intentional order. From the birth of history, the death of famous people has provided(प्रदान ) a breeding ground for conspiracy theories. Clearly, the unfortunate(दुर्भाग्यपूर्ण) and untimely(असामयिक/बेवक़्त) passing away of Jayalalithaa has become a playing ground for such ‘theorists’. Astonishingly(आश्चर्यजनक रूप से,), more than a year after she died, two Tamil Nadu Ministers have called for a probe into her death by a special investigation team. Meanwhile, the Commission of Inquiry headed by Justice (retired) A. Arumughaswamy, constituted(गठित) in September 2017 to probe her illness and death, is well into a third extension(विस्तार) of its tenure( कार्यकाल ). If it sometimes appears( प्रकट होता है) as if the Commission is shooting blindfolded(आँख बंद) in a dark room with blanks, that is because it is unclear if its principal focus is the issue of the “circumstances(परिस्थिति/हालत) and situation(स्थिति) leading to her hospitalisation(अस्पताल में भर्ती होने )”, “subsequent(बाद में/आगामी) treatment” and “unfortunate demise(निधन”)” or a larger conspiracy into her death. Both issues could be related, in theory. But if the main task is to determine(निर्धारित/तय करना) whether the former Chief Minister received adequate(पर्याप्त) medical attention before she was admitted in hospital and during her 75-day stay there, then this can only be settled by independent medical experts.

Inquiry into Jayalalithaa’s death: Politics of probe

The corporate hospital she was treated in has filed a petition(याचिका/सिफ़ारिश) before the Commission seeking the constitution of a medical board comprising( शामिल/दाखिल करना) experts(विशेषज्ञ) in a range of specialities to examine the case records and the interventions(हस्तक्षेप/व्यवधान) made by its doctors. This is an eminently(अत्यंत/उल्लेखनीय ) sensible(समझदार/बुद्धिमान) suggestion, given the complex(जटिल) and debilitating(दुर्बल) matrix of conditions(परिस्थितियों) that Jayalalithaa suffered(पीड़ित) from. Only a complete understanding of her overall medical condition can result in a fair conclusion about the treatment she got. The importance of doing this is all the greater, given reports of critical(महत्वपूर्ण/संकटपूर्ण) errors in the recording of depositions of doctors before the Commission. One of them has gone as far as to say his application to correct errors(त्रुटियों) has failed. The conspiracy angle has been given a new and perplexing(हैरान करनेवाला) lease of life with the Commission’s counsel(परामर्श/सलाह) accusing(आरोप लगा) the hospital and the State’s Health Secretary of “conspiracy” and “collusion(मिलीभगत)” in providing “inappropriate(उपचार) treatment”. It would be improper(अनुचित/अनुपयुक्त) to suggest that the Arumughaswamy panel is conducting the probe(जाँच ) in anything but a fair manner, but it is essential(आवश्यक) that it also gives the impression(प्रभाव/धारणा) that it is doing just that. After all, there is no getting away from the fact that the setting up of an inquiry commission had a clear political motive(राजनीतिक मकसद) — it was a condition that needed to be satisfied to unite the warring AIADMK factions. Chasing elusive(पकड़ में न आने वाला/मायावी) conspiracies will not enhance the Commission’s image; taking the help of competent experts will.

 

Important Vocabulary

1. Manipulated(चालाकी से/तोड़ना-मरोड़ना)
Synonyms: employ, shape, wield, feel, finger
Antonyms: destroy, idle, leave alone

2. Conspiracy(साजिश/मंत्रणा)
Synonyms: plot, scheme, sedition, treason, cabal
Antonyms: faithfulness, honesty, ignorance, loyalty

3. Premised(आधारित)
Synonyms: announce, assume, begin, commence, introduce
Antonyms: calculate, complete, conclude, die, disbelieve

4. Shaped(आकार )
Synonyms: build, carve, construct, embody, fashion
Antonyms: demolish, destroy, dismantle, raze, ruin

5. Constituted(गठित)
Synonyms: create, establish, aggregate, complement, complete
Antonyms: destroy, ruin, break, disarrange, disperse

6. Tenure( कार्यकाल ).
Synonyms: administration, occupation, ownership, regime, reign
Antonyms: misconception, misunderstanding, release

7. Astonishingly(आश्चर्यजनक रूप से,)
Synonyms: absolutely, awfully, certainly, decidedly, deeply
Antonyms: commonly, doubtfully, dubiously, indefinite, little

8. Circumstances(परिस्थिति/हालत)
Synonyms: assets, capital, chances, class, command
Antonyms: debt, poorness, poverty

9. Essential(आवश्यक)
Synonyms: crucial, fundamental, imperative, indispensable, main
Antonyms: auxiliary, extra, inessential, minor, needless

10. Petition(याचिका/सिफ़ारिश)
Synonyms: application, prayer, request, suit, address

11. Comprising( शामिल/दाखिल करना)
Synonyms: amount to, compose, constitute, contain, cover
Antonyms:abandon, destroy, exclude, neglect, ruin

12. Sensible(समझदार/बुद्धिमान)
Synonyms: astute, down-to-earth, intelligent, judicious, logical
Antonyms: excited, foolish, idiotic, ignorant, imbecile

13. Eminently(अत्यंत/उल्लेखनीय )
Synonyms: extremely, highly, remarkably, conspicuously, exceedingly
Antonyms: unimportantly, unremarkably

14. Improper(अनुचित/अनुपयुक्त)
Synonyms: awkward, erroneous, false, ill-advised, imprudent
Antonyms: OK, acceptable, accurate, appropriate, correct

15. Elusive(पकड़ में न आने वाला/मायावी)
Synonyms: ambiguous, fleeting, illusory, incomprehensible, puzzling
Antonyms: definite, honest, intelligible, stable, understandable

 

 

 

Credit To The Hindu News Paper

Jayalalithaa’s death does not deserve to be clouded by murky conspiracy theories
The philosopher Karl Popper argued that conspiracy theories are often premised on the notion that events are manipulated by sinister groups, shaped by a distrust of the notion of randomness and a yearning to explain phenomena in terms of an underlying or intentional order. From the birth of history, the death of famous people has provided a breeding ground for conspiracy theories. Clearly, the unfortunate and untimely passing away of Jayalalithaa has become a playing ground for such ‘theorists’. Astonishingly, more than a year after she died, two Tamil Nadu Ministers have called for a probe into her death by a special investigation team. Meanwhile, the Commission of Inquiry headed by Justice (retired) A. Arumughaswamy, constituted in September 2017 to probe her illness and death, is well into a third extension of its tenure. If it sometimes appears as if the Commission is shooting blindfolded in a dark room with blanks, that is because it is unclear if its principal focus is the issue of the “circumstances and situation leading to her hospitalisation”, “subsequent treatment” and “unfortunate demise” or a larger conspiracy into her death. Both issues could be related, in theory. But if the main task is to determine whether the former Chief Minister received adequate medical attention before she was admitted in hospital and during her 75-day stay there, then this can only be settled by independent medical experts.

Inquiry into Jayalalithaa’s death: Politics of probe

The corporate hospital she was treated in has filed a petition before the Commission seeking the constitution of a medical board comprising experts in a range of specialities to examine the case records and the interventions made by its doctors. This is an eminently sensible suggestion, given the complex and debilitating matrix of conditions that Jayalalithaa suffered from. Only a complete understanding of her overall medical condition can result in a fair conclusion about the treatment she got. The importance of doing this is all the greater, given reports of critical errors in the recording of depositions of doctors before the Commission. One of them has gone as far as to say his application to correct errors has failed. The conspiracy angle has been given a new and perplexing lease of life with the Commission’s counsel accusing the hospital and the State’s Health Secretary of “conspiracy” and “collusion” in providing “inappropriate treatment”. It would be improper to suggest that the Arumughaswamy panel is conducting the probe in anything but a fair manner, but it is essential that it also gives the impression that it is doing just that. After all, there is no getting away from the fact that the setting up of an inquiry commission had a clear political motive — it was a condition that needed to be satisfied to unite the warring AIADMK factions. Chasing elusive conspiracies will not enhance the Commission’s image; taking the help of competent experts will.